As a self-taught programmer, you might also benefit from books that offer broader advice on the profession. You’ll improve your thinking and habits, traits you can apply to any language you decide to learn. Steve McConnell’s 900-page Code Complete: A Practical Handbook of Software Construction (2nd Edition) is considered the definitive guide for best practices, with data-backed advice on everything from project design to debugging code.
You need to be patient with yourself; don’t expect to code the next Fortnite after just a few months of study or a few bootcamps. Coding an error-free wedding RSVP form on a website, or making a simple-yet-correct number prediction game, is already a significant achievement for a beginner. If you get stuck, don’t give up. You should absolutely look for help everywhere you can find it, but also know when to take a break to avoid burnout. And then try, try again.

That's a great list, Kevin. However, nearly all above-mentioned course/tutorial providers provide content for nearly all programming languages/frameworks. Hence a newbie learner would be confused which learning platform to choose out of the lot. For ex. if one is interested in learning Python, all the above-mentioned platforms provide Python courses/tutorials. To solve this dilemma, Hackr.io (https://hackr.io) is the programming community where learners can find the best online programming courses and tutorials recommended by the community. PS: Sorry for the self-promotion ( Am Hackr co-founder) but I thought of informing the readers about the possible solution.
I think there’s so much stuff and challenges and quizzes and videos to help, but it gets really confusing sometimes when there’s so much information thrown at you. In the assignments tab I think you should add important key features, viewing the assignments from due earlier to due later, viewing assignments from highest level like 88% on a practice to 100% on a practice and separating them from videos and practices and everything else. It’s really a pain to scroll all the way to the bottom to see my assignments I didn’t complete since my teachers assign a LOT and I mean A LOT of homework on your app. I decided to rate your app fairly and not biased on we’re I like math or not, but rather the methods to teach and learn math. So there are some highlights. I like that you get hints for every single practice and it must be hard to make all of the detailed word problems. I also like that you can look back into the questions you messed up and learn from those questions.
I recommend checking out CS Dojo, TheNetNinja, and Harvard’s CS50 YouTube channel. If you don’t have time to search for a perfect coding video or channel, you can also check out LinkedIn Learning’s vast video library for vetted and professional-looking tutorials. While the service’s $30/month subscription fee is nothing to sneeze at, you can binge-watch an unlimited amount of content and topics—making LinkedIn Learning a better deal than other on-demand online classes that come with annoying restrictions.
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