I recommend checking out CS Dojo, TheNetNinja, and Harvard’s CS50 YouTube channel. If you don’t have time to search for a perfect coding video or channel, you can also check out LinkedIn Learning’s vast video library for vetted and professional-looking tutorials. While the service’s $30/month subscription fee is nothing to sneeze at, you can binge-watch an unlimited amount of content and topics—making LinkedIn Learning a better deal than other on-demand online classes that come with annoying restrictions.
Want more one-on-one coaching and career prep without doing a full-time bootcamp? Try signing up for the subscription-model certification courses from Udacity or Treehouse, where you have the opportunity to ask a tutor for help instead of suffering your coding mistakes or questions alone. You can’t do much better than the $19 coding classes from Udemy (even less, when there’s a sale)—even full-time bootcamp and computer science students sign up for these classes to supplement their learning.

I think there’s so much stuff and challenges and quizzes and videos to help, but it gets really confusing sometimes when there’s so much information thrown at you. In the assignments tab I think you should add important key features, viewing the assignments from due earlier to due later, viewing assignments from highest level like 88% on a practice to 100% on a practice and separating them from videos and practices and everything else. It’s really a pain to scroll all the way to the bottom to see my assignments I didn’t complete since my teachers assign a LOT and I mean A LOT of homework on your app. I decided to rate your app fairly and not biased on we’re I like math or not, but rather the methods to teach and learn math. So there are some highlights. I like that you get hints for every single practice and it must be hard to make all of the detailed word problems. I also like that you can look back into the questions you messed up and learn from those questions. 

Codewars adds some quirk to the proceedings by offering free coding classes with a martial arts theme. Solving specific coding “katas” (a term for training exercises in karate) will earn you ranks and honors as you move your way to becoming a bonafide coder. Who said learning to code online couldn’t be fun? Codewars also offers one of the more diverse lists of programming languages. Choose free coding classes on:
It is more important to have a low error percentage than a higher speed. The low error percentage will be your best guarantee for success in the following lessons. You can follow your progress at the statistics page (just press the button 'Statistics' at the upper right corner) You should strive to do all lessons flawless (or at least with max two percent error) before you go on to the next lesson. If you learn to type flawless a high typing speed will automatically ensue. By the way, the error statistics will only save your best results.
Instead of hyper-focusing on learning a specific programming language, you can also learn to problem solve in a way that a computer will understand. In other words, improve your skills at concepts like pattern recognition, algorithms, and abstractions. There’s also lingo, like loops, which are bound to pop up in any language you use. The better you understand these principles, the easier it will be to learn the next language (and design better products or projects as a result).

Learn using videos, interactive exercises, and in-depth articles in math (arithmetic, pre-algebra, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, statistics, calculus, linear algebra), science (biology, chemistry, physics), economics (microeconomics, macroeconomics), humanities (art history, civics, finance, US history, US government and politics, world history), and more (including computer science principles)!


I can’t recommend Harvard’s CS50x Introduction to Computer Science enough. You can audit the course for free via edX and earn a certificate by completing all the assignments, or you can go at your own pace and watch all the lectures posted on Youtube. You can build your own DIY college-level computer science program with this selection of fifteen online courses (many of which are also listed in our Lifehacker U series).


On the other hand, if you’re a mid-career professional looking to transition into a tech career, a short-term coding bootcamp might make more sense than going into debt for a second degree. If all you want to do is build websites or push your Raspberry Pi to its limits, a combination of interactive tutorials and free online courses might be enough to get you going.
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