I recommend checking out CS Dojo, TheNetNinja, and Harvard’s CS50 YouTube channel. If you don’t have time to search for a perfect coding video or channel, you can also check out LinkedIn Learning’s vast video library for vetted and professional-looking tutorials. While the service’s $30/month subscription fee is nothing to sneeze at, you can binge-watch an unlimited amount of content and topics—making LinkedIn Learning a better deal than other on-demand online classes that come with annoying restrictions.
Second, Keybr.com measures your keystroke dynamics and collects comprehensive typing statistics. For example, it measures your typing speed for each individual key, and uses this data to generate random words putting emphasis on the weakest key. The more troubles you have with a particular key, the more you will be  typing it. It means, the generating algorithm will put that letter in every word in the next generated lesson. Your typing skills are re-evaluated after every completed lesson, and the next lesson will be adjusted accordingly.
Coding games are also a fun way to get your feet wet in programming. If you have an hour to kill, you can give the simple Hour of Code games a try. Additionally, many schools already use the Minecraft: Educational Edition to teach kids programming basics with coding blocks, and even JavaScript. (You can download this version of Minecraft for free if you have an Office 365 Education account.)
I recommend checking out CS Dojo, TheNetNinja, and Harvard’s CS50 YouTube channel. If you don’t have time to search for a perfect coding video or channel, you can also check out LinkedIn Learning’s vast video library for vetted and professional-looking tutorials. While the service’s $30/month subscription fee is nothing to sneeze at, you can binge-watch an unlimited amount of content and topics—making LinkedIn Learning a better deal than other on-demand online classes that come with annoying restrictions.
Mastering typing skills takes training and practice. Practice on a regular schedule, 10 minutes to an hour per session, depending on your energy and focus level. As Vince Lombardi said, “Practice doesn’t make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect,” so it is important that you practice at a time and place where you can maintain focus and accuracy. Eliminate any potential distractions. If you find yourself making lots of errors, slow down and find a way to regain your focus or call it a day. The goal of practicing is to build muscle memory. You do not want to “learn” bad habits and mistakes.
Codeasy is probably the newest one from the whole list. It is quite interesting educational course because it drives a new concept to computer science studying. You start learning there by reading an adventure story about fighting machines in the future. On your way, you’ll meet challenges that require real coding to solve. The final goal is to save the world from machine invasion. And as a very important side effect – become a software developer.
Also, something that I've found is that if you go wrong somewhere instead of mindlessly searching for the error (assuming there are multiple or you don't know the error's location) just start from the beginning and go down seeing that if this works. If you see a break and something disconnects, in all probability that's where the error is. It's all logic.

A lot of people type with two fingers, and thus type around 10 - 15 words per minute. After completion of this course you should be able to type at least 45 words per minute, and even faster if you type often. If you at your job type nine hours a week you will be able to save the six out of these nine hours provided you triple your typing speed. That will be nearly 300 hours saved a year or seven weeks extra holy days a year. If you have 30 years left before you go on pension the course will save you about 230 weeks work. Are you self employed you will be able to stop working four years early. Or, if you could convert your increased typing speed into a pay raise, you could get four years extra payment before retirement. Learning how to touch type is probably one of the best educations you could invest in. And it won't cost you any money. You can here: calculate your own personal benefit from improving your typing speed. How ever it works out for you, you have probably never met a person who regretted spending some time improving his or her typing speed.


Second, Keybr.com measures your keystroke dynamics and collects comprehensive typing statistics. For example, it measures your typing speed for each individual key, and uses this data to generate random words putting emphasis on the weakest key. The more troubles you have with a particular key, the more you will be  typing it. It means, the generating algorithm will put that letter in every word in the next generated lesson. Your typing skills are re-evaluated after every completed lesson, and the next lesson will be adjusted accordingly.
Also, something that I've found is that if you go wrong somewhere instead of mindlessly searching for the error (assuming there are multiple or you don't know the error's location) just start from the beginning and go down seeing that if this works. If you see a break and something disconnects, in all probability that's where the error is. It's all logic.
Learn using videos, interactive exercises, and in-depth articles in math (arithmetic, pre-algebra, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, statistics, calculus, linear algebra), science (biology, chemistry, physics), economics (microeconomics, macroeconomics), humanities (art history, civics, finance, US history, US government and politics, world history), and more (including computer science principles)!
On the other hand, if you’re a mid-career professional looking to transition into a tech career, a short-term coding bootcamp might make more sense than going into debt for a second degree. If all you want to do is build websites or push your Raspberry Pi to its limits, a combination of interactive tutorials and free online courses might be enough to get you going.
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You should do your touch typing lessons as often as you are capable of without hurting your fingers! As with everything else, regular training gives the best result. Most people will probably get the best result by distributing the lessons to several days in the week rather the doing a lot of exercises in one day. It is a good idea to put your touch type training into a calendar to be sure to remember to do them. If you don't have a calendar you can use the Google calendar which is free and easy to use. In this way it is easier to remember to do your exercises.

Coding games are also a fun way to get your feet wet in programming. If you have an hour to kill, you can give the simple Hour of Code games a try. Additionally, many schools already use the Minecraft: Educational Edition to teach kids programming basics with coding blocks, and even JavaScript. (You can download this version of Minecraft for free if you have an Office 365 Education account.)
Khan Academy is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization with the mission of providing a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. Khan Academy Kids was created by experienced early learning experts who have created 22 other top-selling titles and received 22 Parents’ Choice Awards, 19 Children’s Technology Review Awards, and a KAPi award for Best Children’s App at the International Consumer Electronics Show. The Khan Academy Kids team is a passionate group of engineers, artists, designers, and educators who joined Khan Academy from Duck Duck Moose, a maker of popular educational apps for kids. Khan Academy Kids is 100% free without ads or subscriptions.
Luckily, institutions like the Flatiron School and The Grace Hopper Program offer scholarships or deferred tuition to make these bootcamps more affordable for under-represented groups like minorities and women in tech. Check out Course Report for a comprehensive breakdown of the many online and in-person bootcamps—including detailed reviews from their alums, which can help you decide whether a bootcamp is going to help you achieve your programming dreams.
As a self-taught programmer, you might also benefit from books that offer broader advice on the profession. You’ll improve your thinking and habits, traits you can apply to any language you decide to learn. Steve McConnell’s 900-page Code Complete: A Practical Handbook of Software Construction (2nd Edition) is considered the definitive guide for best practices, with data-backed advice on everything from project design to debugging code.
Based out of New Zealand, Code Avengers provides fun and interactive programming lessons for kids 5 to 14; for schoolteachers wanting to teach coding; for people going into coding professionally; and for creators ages 15 and up. Also offered are one- to three-day "code camps" for students up to 17. These day camps are located in multiple states -- and foreign countries.
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